Looking at Wooton Victorian Antique Desk

By on 10-10-2017 in Blog Post, Letterwriting

Looking at Wooton Victorian Antique Desk
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Today we are merely looking at the top surface of a Wooton Victorian Antique Desk for our letter writing interests. We are looking at the ultimate desk – think lots of cubby holes and drawers.  Specifically, the Wooton Victorian Antique Desk we are covering today is from an article at The VictorianWeb.Org site writing about Dr. Barnardo.

Think of all the items for storing in something of this design. In addition, towards the end of my post, I’m including a quick reference from two previous blog posts on a much smaller scale for portable letter writing desks; one on an antique style writing lap desk, and another on a leather stationery box. There will be more on my introduction sentence at the conclusion of my post.

Before we begin, there is for overall reference: The Wooton Desk’s Style, History and Significance, The Victorian Version of Modern Conveniences, by Troy Segal.  

Over at The VictorianWeb.Org site, the Author, Jacqueline Banerjee, Ph.D., Associate Editor has written a summary history on “Dr. Barnardo and his Work for Children”. The page includes this photo of his desk.  The desk is housed in the “London largest ‘Ragged School,’ now the Ragged School Museum.”

The image – From The VictorianWeb.Org site, “Dr. Barnardo’s desk inside a ground floor room, complete with its original labels etc.”

From the VictorianWeb.Org Site – Dr. Barnardo’s Desk

victorianwebdotorg_history_orphanages_barnardo1.jpg

You can click on the image and it will link to their page.

The article begins with “Thomas John Barnardo (1845–1905) was born in Dublin on 4 July 1845.”   

“During his early months in London, Dr Barnardo, as he wished to be known, became deeply involved with helping the East End, preaching out-of-doors, and for a while teaching at the Ernest Street Ragged School. Together with a few fellow-students at the London Hospital, he then opened an independent Ragged School at some old stabling nearby, which had fallen into disuse. …

London largest ‘Ragged School,’ now the Ragged School Museum. Copperfield Road, Mile End, East London. Originally three canalside warehouses, this forbidding building on the towpath of the Regent’s Canal housed the largest of London’s Ragged Schools. It was run by the famous Dr Barnardo, founder of the Dr Barnardo’s children’s homes and promoter of large-scale child emmigration. Dr Barnardo opened the school in 1877, when his first school (at Hope Place in nearby Stepney, where he initiated his “The East End Juvenile Mission”) proved inadequate. It ran until 1908…”

Furthermore, with today’s topic, I’m including these two images from previous blog posts on Daydreaming for Life Of Riley Leather Stationery Box, and Quest continues for the perfect Antique Style Writing Lap Desk for Letter Writing.

Now back to my introduction opener; somehow I could not bring myself to lamely suggest we are ‘scratching the surface’ with today’s topic!

Life Of Riley Leather Stationery BoxAnchors Aweigh,  

Helen


Wooton Victorian Antique Desk Attribution & Thank you to the following I’m referencing today for my daily blog post encouraging letter writing –

The Wooton Desk’s Style, History and Significance, The Victorian Version of Modern Conveniences, by Troy Segal, Updated 04/04/17.

Tweet 12:04 PM – 6 Oct 2017 @jh_heather

VictorianWeb.org: Dr. Barnardo and his Work for Children, by Jacqueline Banerjee, PPh.D. Associate Editor, Image, and excerpt.

Antique Style Writing Lap DeskTwitter @sjregoodrum  Retweet 4:11 PM – 6 Oct 2017. “J Goodrum Retweeted Victorian Web – Wow! I could do with a desk like that!”

@VictorianWeb Tweet 5:23 AM – 6 Oct 2017: “Dr Barnardo’s desk on display @RaggedSchool Museum. More organised than your desktop?! …

AnchoredScraps daily blog post: Daydreaming for Life Of Riley Leather Stationery Box, February 16, 2017; Quest continues for the perfect Antique Style Writing Lap Desk for Letter Writing, April 24, 2017; by Helen Rittersporn.